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Triumph Of Venus Oil On Canvas Late '700 Early '800
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ARAROT0082956

Triumph Of Venus Oil On Canvas Late '700 Early '800

From Cardboard By Carlo Cignani

ARAROT0082956

Triumph Of Venus Oil On Canvas Late '700 Early '800

From Cardboard By Carlo Cignani

Oil on canvas. The painting is an exact copy of the piece by the same name created by Carlo Cignani (1628-1719) for the Room Of Love in Palazzo del Giardino in Parma, commissioned by Duke Ranuccio II Farnese. According to different sources, Cignani only drew the cardboards of the piece, but the transposition to canvas seem to have taken place between 1678 and 1680 by Marcantonio Franceschini (1648 - 1729) and Luigi Quaini (1643-1717), who were his pupils and later his collaborators. The two artists from Bologna, tied by an artistic bond in which the first painted the figures and the second the landscapes, still worked together with Cignani for many of his pieces, and with other students of his they were often busy reporting on frescoes the cardboard drawings of the master. The cardboards of the piece became property of the English consul in Venice, Joseph Smith, bibliophile and patron, who commissioned a "Description of the cardboards drawn by Carlo Cignani and the paintings by Sebastiano Ricci: owned by Mr Giuseppe Smith, consul of Great Britain, in the Serene Republic of Venice, with a compendium of the lifes of the two renowned professors" to Pietro Ercole Gherardi (1687 -1752), university professor, vice-librarian of the Estense court and collaborator of Ludovico Antonio Muratori, edited by Giambattista Pasquali in 1749. In that piece, Gherardi (or maybe cunsul Smith himself) describes the preparing drawing meticulously, "a larger than usual cardboard, on which the appraised Cignani figured out the chiaroscuro of the Triumph of Venus". Consul Smith also decided to have the drawings of both Cignani and Ricci carved and crafted by bulin, commissioning the work to the famous Parisian carver Jean Michel Liotard, to "make (the pieces) visible to those who couldn't see the originals as well". The description of the piece is detailed in every figure and detail. In the great scene the cart stands out in the centre and Venus and Cupid are sitting on it; the carriage is pulled by four small figures, two puttos and two small satyrs, over which another small winged putto flies, armed with a bow; in front of the carriage there is a young boy who plays a ten-stringed harp, who is considered the personification of Pleasure by some. Around and over the carriage, a group of nymphs, of the earth and of the air, with wings dance and twirl, surrounding the deities joyfully. Under the carriage wheels, trampled on and covered by the cloth of a banner, there are different objects: a military emblem, the legionary eagle, a laurel crown, a sword, a shield, a book, an open compass, which could be the symbols of the triumph of Love over War, Art and Literature. According to other interpretations, they could be symbols for the triumph of Venus over the other deities Juno and Pallas, pictured through their symbols, in the Judgement of Paris. According to more recente evaluations, the three paintings by Cignani in the Room of Love of Palazzo Giardino in Parma all trace back to the wedding of Bacchus and Ariadne, and what is traditionally interpreted as a "Triumph of Venus" would actually be the "Nuptial Procession of Ariadne", who is the main character. It is clear how the young girl portraying Ariadne in the two other scenes and particularly in the third one that represents the Wedding of Bacchus and Ariadne, celebrated by the goddess iof Love, is identical in the face, in the pearl arrangement, in the blue cloak to the presumed Venus in the central painting. According to this interpretation, the young boy preceding the procession would actually be Hymen and not Pleasure, portrayed with blond hair and a wreath of "scented marjoram" and with the "candid foot with the yellow sandal", as Catullus describes him in Carme 61. Ariadne's carriage is pulled by two satyrs, typical followers of Bacchus and two Puttos, with ivy crowns, an additional hint to the god. And Cupid, sitting on the carriage next to Ariadne, is pointing his gold arrow against her, to indicate her new love for Bacchus, to which alludes the light up torch between the hands of the young lady as well. The abundance of interpretations and symbols of this piece can be found in the copy here proposed, faithful to the original in very detail. The painting is in its original canvas and has some signs of restorations; the study of the cracking and the canvas, of Northern-European structure, sets the piece at the end of '700, beginning of '800. The painting is presented in a frame from the second half of '800.

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Scope Of Lorenzo Lippi Oil On Canvas 17th Century
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ARTPIT0001627

Scope Of Lorenzo Lippi Oil On Canvas 17th Century

Saint Rocco Confronted By The Angel

ARTPIT0001627

Scope Of Lorenzo Lippi Oil On Canvas 17th Century

Saint Rocco Confronted By The Angel

Oil on canvas. The big scene representsa moment of the life of Saint Rocco, the French peregrin and miracle worker that is considered one of the most invoked saints, from the Middle Ages onwards, as the protector from the terrible scourge of the plague and later from all the scourges and catastrophies that afflicted humanity. Even now, in 2020, during the pandemic, the Saint has been the recepient of prayers and invocations to protect from the virus in many Christian communities in the world. The Saint is pictured during his imprisonment, that will lead him to death, that he underwent in Voghera during his return from Italy to France, with the accusation of espionage because, miserable and tattered, he hadn't been recognized by anyone, and he could not justify his passage through tormented and suspicious lands. There are many of the iconographic attributes of the Saint in the piece: he is only wearing a cape, the sandals and the buckle that holds his bottle tied to his chest; at his feet, there is the cloak and the cane of the peregrin; on his right, a dog with a piece of bread that, accirding to the legend, the animal was stealing from the canteen of a rich merchant to feed the sick Saint; on his left thigh you can see the lesion, sign of the illness the struck him. The piece is attributed to the scope of Lorenzo Lippi (1606-1684), Tuscan artist from 17th century, recognizable from the dry style and inspired by reality, but in particular for the poses and the peculiar anatomical conformations of the figures he painted: you can confront the close correspondence between the angel of this painting and the one in the Sacrifice of Isaac, preserved in Saint Lucia of Montecastello, but even the posture of Isaac, sitting but reclined back with his legs open like Saint Rocco. in a pose that seems to belong to the production of the artist specifically. We know that the production of Lorenzo Lippi, who was not only a painter but a literatus as well, was almost complitely dedicated to the religious and devotional subject, painted not only for the public clientele (city and country Churches), but for private clients as well; even in the production of portraits, that were the reason for his trip to Innsbruck as the Court painter, the subjects of the paintings were often included in sacred scenes. For centuries, the figure of the artist Lippi had few acknoledgements, and he was criticized for being "too determined" in remaining faithful to his style, made of a "pure and simple imitation of nature", as if he was an artist with no creativity and not very inclined to embrace the pictorial novelties introduced in the artistic scene; in particular the flair of the Baroque is missing from his production as well as the adhesion to the taste of the Court of the Medici, based on splendour and the sensuality of the models, remaing tied to the archaisms of the previous century, in particular to the ones of Santi from Tito, to remain close to the religious feeling of the Florentine people and its confraternities. His compositions, however, respond to the precise balance, both formal and narrational, with scenes lit ina clear manner, with a drawing that is almost from the Renaissance, with plastic postures that highlight the feeling of the character well, with clear characterizations of the faces and the hands, that are always busy in an explicit gesturality, demonstrative of the contents of the scene. The painting proposed here, already restored and reframed, is presented in a frame in style.

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Saint Paul Hermit And Saint Anthony Abbot Oil On Canvas 17th Century
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ARARPI0057281

Saint Paul Hermit And Saint Anthony Abbot Oil On Canvas 17th Century

ARARPI0057281

Saint Paul Hermit And Saint Anthony Abbot Oil On Canvas 17th Century

Oil on canvas. Lombard school. The painting portrays the two saints sitting on rocks in the shadows of leafy trees, while they break bread, in the foreground on the left; Saint Paul is traditionally dressed with animal skins, Saint Anthony Abbot is wearing the habit of the Order and he is holding a prayer book. The two Saints have often been represented together becasue they share many traits: they both lived in the third century, they are both Egyptian, they both left all of their properties very young to devote themselves to a life of complete solitude, living in prayer and poverty. Saint Anthony Abbot has been one of the most famous hermits in the history of the Church. Saint Paul the Hermit lived all of his life in complete solitude in the desert as well, fed only with the bread a raven would regularly bring to him, according to hagiographic narratives. When he was closer to death, Saint Anthony Abbot visited him, with whom he broke bread. In this representation, the landscape context doesn't remind of the desert lands of Egypt, but they are located in a Nordic or Alpine landscape. On the left, there is an eremitical landscape, with some green and a small stream bottom right. The painting, already restored and recanvased, presents evident craquelure. Frame in style.

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7,400.00€

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Portrait of a Noblewoman by Il Mulinaretto 18th Century
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ARTPIT0001472

Portrait of a Noblewoman by Il Mulinaretto 18th Century

Portrait of a Noblewoman

ARTPIT0001472

Portrait of a Noblewoman by Il Mulinaretto 18th Century

Portrait of a Noblewoman

Oil on canvas. This half-length portrait depicts a gentlewoman who certainly belongs to a noble family, you can desume it by the elegant dress and by the medal that the woman is wearing. The medal is situated exactly in the centre of the painting. It is the medal of the order "Ordine della Croce Stellata", a chivalry order for women only established by Eleonora Gonzaga, widow of the emperor Ferdinando III. The order was then confirmed by Clemente IX with a papal edict in 1668. This medal was conferred only to noble women. Delle Piane (known as "Il Mulinaretto") was born in Genova but he completed his artistic formation in Rome. Since he was young he had a natural inclination towards portraiture. He was influenced by the french-manner portraiture (in particular by Hiacynthe Rigaud and by Laguillère) and thanks to his abitility to read the requirements of his time, he adapted to new tendencies. His commissioners were rich and powerful and wanted to be celebrated through their portraits. Delle Piane brought stylistic innovation, bringing to a higher level the sophistication of small details, enhancing the mundanity of his commissioners, dressing them up in exquisite and sumptuous manner and capturing new and interesting poses. Delle Piane worked relentlessly for more than sixty years. He has produced also paintings with religious subject, but he is best known for his portraits, there are plenty attributed to him, in many private houses. The elegance, the affectation in contrast with the severe pose and the lascivious gesture of the hand which holds the mantle, are part of the typical features of Delle Piane's paintings. The painting is presented in a coeval silver-plated frame with inlaid decor and a ribbon on top.

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Painting by Arman 10000 Cendrillons 2003
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ARTCON0000756

Painting by Arman 10000 Cendrillons 2003

10000 Cendrillons

ARTCON0000756

Painting by Arman 10000 Cendrillons 2003

10000 Cendrillons

Mixed technique on canvas. Armand Fernandez, stage name Arman, was born in Nice in 1928. He is remembered as one of the most significant and influential members of the artistic movement 'Nouveau Réalisme', the European declination of the American New Dada. The Nouveau Réalisme was founded in 1960 in France by the critic Pierre Restany. The members of the nouveaux réalistes group tended to see the world as an image from which they could take parts and incorporate them into their works - as they sought to bring life and art closer together. They declared that they had come together on the basis of a new and real awareness of their "collective singularity", meaning that they were together in spite of, or perhaps because of, their differences. But for all the diversity of their plastic language, they perceived a common basis for their work; this being a method of direct appropriation of reality, equivalent, in the terms used by Pierre Restany, to a "poetic recycling of urban, industrial and advertising reality". Artists of Nouveau Réalisme sought out to strip art of previously thought standards that art had to mean something, they could take any object beyond its preconceived notions and present it as itself, and thought it could still be considered art. Many of them also sought to break down the glamorization of artists producing their craft in private, and due to this often times art pieces were produced in public. The work comes from the artist's studio in New York and is certified by the email of Fondation A.R.M.A.N. showing also the file number. Fondation A.R.M.A.N. is currently the only institution having the right to issue certifications for Arman's works. A picture of the painting signed by the artist and showing the file number, title, dimensions and technique is enclosed. On the back of the picture there is the stamp of the Art Gallery Dante Vecchiato which was a reference point for the distribution of Arman's works in Italy in the early 2000.

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10,000.00€

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No Title by Arman Jeté 2003
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SELECTED
ARTCON0000755

No Title by Arman Jeté 2003

Jeté

ARTCON0000755

No Title by Arman Jeté 2003

Jeté

Mixed technique on canvas. Armand Fernandez, stage name Arman, was born in Nice in 1928. He is remembered as one of the most significant and influential members of the artistic movement 'Nouveau Réalisme', the European declination of the American New Dada. The Nouveau Réalisme was founded in 1960 in France by the critic Pierre Restany. The members of the nouveaux réalistes group tended to see the world as an image from which they could take parts and incorporate them into their works - as they sought to bring life and art closer together. They declared that they had come together on the basis of a new and real awareness of their "collective singularity", meaning that they were together in spite of, or perhaps because of, their differences. But for all the diversity of their plastic language, they perceived a common basis for their work; this being a method of direct appropriation of reality, equivalent, in the terms used by Pierre Restany, to a "poetic recycling of urban, industrial and advertising reality". Artists of Nouveau Réalisme sought out to strip art of previously thought standards that art had to mean something, they could take any object beyond its preconceived notions and present it as itself, and thought it could still be considered art. Many of them also sought to break down the glamorization of artists producing their craft in private, and due to this often times art pieces were produced in public. The work comes from the artist's studio in New York and is certified by the email of Fondation A.R.M.A.N. showing also the file number. Fondation A.R.M.A.N. is currently the only institution having the right to issue certifications for Arman's works. A picture of the painting signed by the artist and showing the file number, title, dimensions and technique is enclosed. On the back of the picture there is the stamp of the Art Gallery Dante Vecchiato which was a reference point for the distribution of Arman's works in Italy in the early 2000.

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5,200.00€

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